ARCT5512 Architectural Technical Resolution

Credit
6 points
Offering
(see Timetable)
AvailabilityLocationMode
Not available in 2018UWA (Perth)Face to face
Content
This unit sets out to demonstrate the relationship between intention and technique in architectural design and resolution. It is involved in teaching how to 'discover', 'test' and 'learn' by means of drawing. In looking at the aspects involved in architectural design development the unit is taught in two concurrent streams. The first stream consists of a series of lectures which look at the embodiment and expression of architectural theory and intent in a number of significant buildings from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. The second stream consists of weekly workshops which involve each student analysing a selected architect's work as well as developing a detailed design for a small reading booth.

This design process is articulated in two parts—

Part A: This is run through weekly workshops. It consists of an investigation and interpretation of a work by a selected architect whom the student considers to be a fundamental reference for their reading booth. Students are required to trace and clarify the relationship between the selected architect's theory and ideas and the physiognomy of their building. Students use the practice of drawing, layering and tracing as a means of investigation to discover the phenomena of architecture, from the larger scale to the more detailed one, with 1:20 being the crucial scale of investigation. The students' selections must be discussed with and approved by their tutor at their first tutorial. This first exercise (Part A) forms the basis of knowledge and understanding to be implemented in the second exercise (Part B).

Part B: The objective of this exercise is to develop a given layout into a detailed architectural proposition. Students are given a site, shape, layout plans and sections of a concept design for the reading booth. The task turns this concept design into a small building that reflects the student's own architectural vision. The given concept design is developed through numerous studies at a minimum scale of 1:20, looking at architectural intent; materials; structure; building sequence; integration of structure and space; expression of program; fenestration; weathering; and in-built furniture. It is intended that in Part B students demonstrates how the investigation of Part A has improved their understanding of the phenomena of architecture.
Outcomes
Students are able to (1) extend their knowledge of both architectural detailing and the nature of architectural ideas; (2) apply principles of order, hierarchy, sensibility to materials, construction techniques and processes and finishes to their own work; and (3) identify and gain a deeper understanding, of the design ideas (through resolution) of some of the most significant buildings of the twentieth century.
Assessment
Typically this unit is assessed in the following ways: (1) presentation and (2) folio submission. Further information is available in the unit outline.

Supplementary assessment is not available in this unit.
Unit Coordinator(s)
Associate Professor Andrea Quagliola
Contact hours
lectures: 2 hours per week; workshops: 2 hours per week
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  • Books and other material wherever listed may be subject to change. Book lists relating to 'Preliminary reading', 'Recommended reading' and 'Textbooks' are, in most cases, available at the University Co-operative Bookshop (from early January) and appropriate administrative offices for students to consult. Where texts are listed in the unit description above, an asterisk (*) indicates that the book is available in paperback.