BIOL5502 Managing Threatened Species

Credit
6 points
Offering
(see Timetable)
AvailabilityLocationMode
Non-standard teaching periodUWA (Perth)Multi-mode
Non-standard teaching periodAlbanyFace to face
Content
This unit examines principles for the practical management of threatened species and communities. Students learn principles of population dynamics and ecology and acquire the capacity to apply these principles to formulate management plans for the control of feral animals and pests or for the recovery of endangered species. The unit is based on self-paced study guides, each of which is introduced during a tutorial where students are briefed on the content of the study guides, on the level of understanding that is required, and on the method of assessment. Students are able to participate in a fauna survey and learn how to set traps to capture, handle and measure small- and medium-sized mammals. While in the field they also examine features of the vegetation that affect the local wildlife. They are able to calculate population estimates using capture-mark-recapture methods, and to produce written professional reports on these findings. Under the guidance of local Department of Parks and Wildlife officers students will also participate in field work related to the management of threatened plant species and/or communities.
These skills make students more employable by environmental consultants and by the Department of Parks and Wildlife.
Outcomes
Students are able to (1) develop the capacity to learn independently; (2) gain knowledge on the principles of population dynamics and ecology; (3) apply these principles to formulate management plans for the control of feral animals and pests or for the recovery of endangered wildlife populations or threatened plant species or communities; and (4) conduct wildlife research on threatened species and produce reports on the outcomes of this research.
Assessment
Typically this unit is assessed in the following ways: (1) an oral interview on concepts of ecology and an exercise in population dynamics and ecology; (2) a recovery plan for an endangered species or a threatened plant community and a management plan for the control of a feral animal or pest; and (3) a written field work report. Further information is available in the unit outline.

Supplementary assessment is not available in this unit.
Unit Coordinator(s)
Associate Professor Roberta Bencini
Unit rules
Prerequisites:
enrolment in Master of Biological Science (72520)
or
Master of Science (70630)
or
honours in Science
Advisable prior study:
SCIE4402 Data Management and Analysis in the Natural Sciences
Incompatibility:
ANIM3356/ANIM3357 Animal Resource Management Part 1/Part 2; ANIM8356/ANIM8357 Animal Resource Management Part 1/Part 2
Approved quota: 30—based on academic merit
Contact hours
Tutorials: 1 hour per week plus self-paced study; total workload for the unit is 150 hours
Note
A field trip to the Lechenault Field Station where students learn how to organise a fauna survey and how to manage threatened plant communities is an essential component of the unit.
Texts

A field trip to the Lechenault Field Station where students learn how to organise a fauna survey and how to trap and handle small and medium sised marsupials is an essential component of the unit.

  • The availability of units in Semester 1, 2, etc. was correct at the time of publication but may be subject to change.
  • All students are responsible for identifying when they need assistance to improve their academic learning, research, English language and numeracy skills; seeking out the services and resources available to help them; and applying what they learn. Students are encouraged to register for free online support through GETSmart; to help themselves to the extensive range of resources on UWA's STUDYSmarter website; and to participate in WRITESmart and (ma+hs)Smart drop-ins and workshops.
  • Books and other material wherever listed may be subject to change. Book lists relating to 'Preliminary reading', 'Recommended reading' and 'Textbooks' are, in most cases, available at the University Co-operative Bookshop (from early January) and appropriate administrative offices for students to consult. Where texts are listed in the unit description above, an asterisk (*) indicates that the book is available in paperback.