CITS4401 Software Requirements and Design

Credit
6 points
Offering
(see Timetable)
AvailabilityLocationMode
Semester 1UWA (Perth)Face to face
Content
Requirements and design are important phases of software development because errors or misunderstandings of software requirements or designs are expensive to correct during later stages and may lead to project failure. This unit introduces the theory and practice of software requirements and design. It aims to equip graduates of the Master of Professional Engineering in the Software Engineering specialisation with the ability to select, evaluate and apply appropriate requirements and design techniques for software projects. The content comprises (1) requirements engineering—elicitation, analysis, specification, documentation and evolution; (2) software design—using formal rationale to document design decisions, design constraints including reliability, availability and maintainability; (3) software architectures—monolithic, distributed, client/server and event driven; and (4) design patterns—observer, abstract factory, adapter, bridge and facade.
Outcomes
Students are able to (1) write a research report on requirements and design techniques; (2) make an oral presentation on technical topics; (3) apply critical thinking in the selection and application of requirements and design techniques; (4) demonstrate interpersonal skills in group exercises; (5) discuss the methods, practice and discourse conventions of software engineering research; (6) describe the requirements engineering process— elicitation, analysis, documentation and evolution; (7) explain several different requirements engineering methods and select methods for a given project; (8) evaluate and document software design rationale; (9) explain the software design constraints of reliability, availability and maintainability and how these impact design choices; (10) describe and apply common software architectures (monolithic, distributed, client/server, event driven); and (11) describe and apply common design patterns (observer, abstract factory, adapter, bridge, facade).
Assessment
Typically this unit is assessed in the following ways: (1) group workshop assesments; (2) a research assignment; (3) a practical design assignment; and (4) a final examination. Further information is available in the unit outline.

Supplementary assessment is only available in this unit in the case of a student who has obtained a mark of 45 to 49 and is currently enrolled in this unit, and it is the only remaining unit that the student must pass in order to complete their course.
Unit Coordinator(s)
Dr Du Huynh
Unit rules
Prerequisites:
enrolment in the Master of Professional Engineering (Software Engineering specialisation)
or
enrolment in the Master of Information Technology; for pre-2012 courses: CITS1200 Java Programming
or
CITS1220 Software Engineering
or
CITS1001 Object-oriented Programming and Software Engineering
Advisable prior study:
CITS1001 Object-oriented Programming and Software Engineering
and
(CITS1002 Programming and Systems
or
CITS2002 Programming and Systems)
Incompatibility:
CITS2220 Software Engineering: Design
and
CITS3220 Software Requirements and Project Management
  • The availability of units in Semester 1, 2, etc. was correct at the time of publication but may be subject to change.
  • All students are responsible for identifying when they need assistance to improve their academic learning, research, English language and numeracy skills; seeking out the services and resources available to help them; and applying what they learn. Students are encouraged to register for free online support through GETSmart; to help themselves to the extensive range of resources on UWA's STUDYSmarter website; and to participate in WRITESmart and (ma+hs)Smart drop-ins and workshops.
  • Books and other material wherever listed may be subject to change. Book lists relating to 'Preliminary reading', 'Recommended reading' and 'Textbooks' are, in most cases, available at the University Co-operative Bookshop (from early January) and appropriate administrative offices for students to consult. Where texts are listed in the unit description above, an asterisk (*) indicates that the book is available in paperback.