ECON4507 History of Economic Thought

Credit
6 points
Offering
(see Timetable)
AvailabilityLocationMode
Semester 1UWA (Perth)Face to face
Details for undergraduate courses
  • Honours option in Economics [Bachelor of Commerce (Honours)]
Content
This unit provides an in-depth study of the history of economic thought. Particular emphasis is placed on classical political economy including the ideas of Smith, Ricardo, Malthus, Mill and Marx; and neo-classical economics such as the ideas of Jevons, Walras, Pareto and Marshall.
Outcomes
Students are able to (1) identify and discuss the major themes of European economic thought prior to Adam Smith, with particular reference to work undertaken within the Mercantilist tradition; (2) distinguish between the surplus and the exchange interpretations of the history of classical economic thought; (3) critically appraise the distinction between Classical and Neo-classical economic thought; (4) compare and contrast major works of the leading scholars of the Lausanne and/or the Cambridge Schools; (5) explain the meaning of the term 'historiography' as it applies to studies in the history of economic thought; and (6) demonstrate the capability to communicate important ideas in the history of economics.
Assessment
Indicative assessments in this unit are as follows: (1) participation; (2) essay; and (3) examination. Further information is available in the unit outline.

Supplementary assessment is not available in this unit.
Unit Coordinator(s)
Professor Michael McLure
Unit rules
Prerequisites:
Enrolment in the Bachelor of Commerce (Honours) (BH002)
or
completion of 144 points in the Bachelor of Philosophy (Honours) (BH005)
or
enrolment in the Master of Economics (42620)
or
Master of Public Policy (42580).
Incompatibility:
ECON3310 History of Economic Ideas offered in the Economics major
Contact hours
lectures/Practical Classes/seminars/workshops: up to 3 hours per week
Unit Outline
Semester 1_2019 [SEM-1_2019]
  • The availability of units in Semester 1, 2, etc. was correct at the time of publication but may be subject to change.
  • All students are responsible for identifying when they need assistance to improve their academic learning, research, English language and numeracy skills; seeking out the services and resources available to help them; and applying what they learn. Students are encouraged to register for free online support through GETSmart; to help themselves to the extensive range of resources on UWA's STUDYSmarter website; and to participate in WRITESmart and (ma+hs)Smart drop-ins and workshops.
  • Books and other material wherever listed may be subject to change. Book lists relating to 'Preliminary reading', 'Recommended reading' and 'Textbooks' are, in most cases, available at the University Co-operative Bookshop (from early January) and appropriate administrative offices for students to consult. Where texts are listed in the unit description above, an asterisk (*) indicates that the book is available in paperback.