EMPL3301 Globalisation and Work

Credit
6 points
Offering
(see Timetable)
AvailabilityLocationMode
Semester 1UWA (Perth)Face to face
Details for undergraduate courses
  • Level 3 core unit in the Work and Employment Relations major sequence
  • The area of knowledge for this unit is Management and Commerce
  • Category A broadening unit for Bachelor of Arts students where relevant according to the broadening requirements for each student
  • Level 3 elective
Content
This unit focuses on how globalisation is transforming work, employment and society at a local level. The unit therefore considers facets of these transformations which are central to understanding contemporary employment relations. These include the rise of global corporations; technological and communications change; the reorganisation of work and employment; internal and external labour market change; and the emergence of global production networks and the changing character of local and international trade unionism in response to these structural shifts. The unit considers the relationship between globalisation and these transformations by considering three core issues. First, it identifies and analyses structures of globalisation by discussing organisations, processes, and ideas associated with globalisation and their influence on labour markets, workplaces and society. Second, it considers the experience of work in an era of globalisation by developing a grounded understanding of how globalisation has reshaped work and worker identity. Third, it considers individual and collective responses to the impact of globalisation on work with special reference to global labour organisations and networks, non-government organisations, and global regulatory and corporate social responsibility initiatives.
Outcomes
Students are able to (1) describe the core debates over the meaning of the term 'globalisation'; (2) explain the relationship between globalisation and labour market and workplace restructuring; (3) identify organisations and institutions central to globalisation and their impact on work; (4) gain a critical appreciation of how globalisation reshapes the experience of work and worker identity; (5) develop a critical understanding of individual and collective responses to the impact of globalisation on work; and (6) demonstrate enhanced written, oral and information literacy skills through participation in class discussions, and through the preparation of an individual essay and written responses in the final examination.
Assessment
Typically this unit is assessed in the following ways: (1) individual essay ; (2) seminar activities ; and (3) examination. Further information is available in the unit outline.

Supplementary assessment is not available in this unit except in the case of a bachelor's pass degree student who has obtained a mark of 45 to 49 overall and is currently enrolled in this unit, and it is the only remaining unit that the student must pass in order to complete their course.
Unit Coordinator(s)
Dr Michael Gillan
Unit rules
Prerequisites:
EMPL2201 Foundations of Employment Relations;
or
EMPL2202 Australian Employment Relations
Contact hours
lectures/Practical Classes/seminars/workshops: up to 3 hours per week
Unit Outline
http://www.unitoutlines.biz.uwa.edu.au/Units/EMPL3301/SEM-1/2018
  • The availability of units in Semester 1, 2, etc. was correct at the time of publication but may be subject to change.
  • All students are responsible for identifying when they need assistance to improve their academic learning, research, English language and numeracy skills; seeking out the services and resources available to help them; and applying what they learn. Students are encouraged to register for free online support through GETSmart; to help themselves to the extensive range of resources on UWA's STUDYSmarter website; and to participate in WRITESmart and (ma+hs)Smart drop-ins and workshops.
  • Books and other material wherever listed may be subject to change. Book lists relating to 'Preliminary reading', 'Recommended reading' and 'Textbooks' are, in most cases, available at the University Co-operative Bookshop (from early January) and appropriate administrative offices for students to consult. Where texts are listed in the unit description above, an asterisk (*) indicates that the book is available in paperback.