PHIL2002 Logic: How to Defeat Your Foes with Reasoning

Credit
6 points
Offering
(see Timetable)
AvailabilityLocationMode
Semester 2UWA (Perth)Face to face
Summer teaching periodUWA (Perth)Face to face
Details for undergraduate courses
Content
Logic is the study of what follows from what. Understanding formal logic is therefore valuable for anyone wishing to construct persuasive arguments or evaluate the reasoning of others. This unit introduces students to powerful techniques for translating natural language arguments into formal logic and for testing those arguments for validity. As well as its general use in evaluating arguments, a knowledge of formal logic is essential to understanding a great deal of important twentieth-century philosophy.
Outcomes
Students are able to (1) locate philosophical ideas in their historical context; (2) evaluate philosophical positions, including identifying counter-examples and identifying and questioning their basic assumptions; (3) compare and contrast philosophical positions; (4) construct persuasive arguments; (5) understand the basic syntactic and semantic structure of propositional logic through to first-order predicate logic with identity; (6) translate natural language arguments into propositional logic and first-order predicate logic with identity; (7) construct truth tables in propositional logic and use them to test the validity of an argument; (8) gain a basic understanding of model theory and its set theoretic foundations; (9) understand the algebraic foundations of propositional and predicate logic; (10) construct truth-functional connectives outside of the standard connectives used in propositional and predicate logic; and (11) consider possible extensions of first-order predicate logic with identity in order to enrich the expressive power of the language.
Assessment
Typically this unit is assessed in the following ways: (1) problem sets; (2) tests; and (3) examination. Further information is available in the unit outline.

To pass this unit, a student must: (a) achieve an overall mark of 50 per cent or higher for the unit; and (b) achieve the requisite standard(s) for the problem sets component of the unit, as specified in the unit outline.

Supplementary assessment is not available in this unit except in the case of a bachelor's pass degree student who has obtained a mark of 45 to 49 overall and is currently enrolled in this unit, and it is the only remaining unit that the student must pass in order to complete their course.
Unit Coordinator(s)
Dr Samuel Baron
Unit rules
Prerequisites:
24 points of Level 1 units
Incompatibility:
PHIL2205 Introduction to Logic
Approved quota: 700—first come basis
Contact hours
Semester 2—lectures: 2 hours per week; tutorials: 1 hour per week (for 10 weeks from week 2); summer teaching period: delivered intensively
Texts

Smith, N. J. Logic: the Laws of Truth: Princeton University Press 2012

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