POLS5686 International Norms, Ethics and Human Rights

Credit
6 points
Offering
(see Timetable)
AvailabilityLocationMode
Non-standard teaching periodUWA (Perth)Face to face
Content
Human rights have become a central issue in international politics, observable in the increasing number of political claims for human rights that have been advanced in recent decades. This unit examines the theory and politics of human rights in a global context. It first considers different normative approaches to conceptualising human rights, and their contested philosophical foundations. It then analyses the politics of human rights through a range of empirical cases, depending on the research interests of teaching staff. These may include refugees, security, citizenship, development justice, and climate change.
Outcomes
Students are able to (1) demonstrate a detailed understanding of the development of the human rights discourse and its increased prominence in international politics; (2) describe and evaluate the key normative and philosophical approaches to human rights; (3) critically appraise key debates regarding human rights claims in global politics; and (4) communicate advanced arguments in written and oral assessments that employ the conventions of the discipline.
Assessment
Typically this unit is assessed in the following ways: (1) seminar preparation and participation; (2) a research essay; and (3) analytical assignments. Further information is available in the unit outline.

Supplementary assessment is not available in this unit.
Contact hours
seminars: 18 hours (over the course of a semester)
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  • Books and other material wherever listed may be subject to change. Book lists relating to 'Preliminary reading', 'Recommended reading' and 'Textbooks' are, in most cases, available at the University Co-operative Bookshop (from early January) and appropriate administrative offices for students to consult. Where texts are listed in the unit description above, an asterisk (*) indicates that the book is available in paperback.