UWA Handbook 2017

Unit details

SSEH2260 Exercise Physiology

Credit 6 points
  Offering
(see Timetable)
AvailabilityLocationMode
Semester 1UWA (Perth)Face to face
Details for undergraduate courses
  • Level 2 core unit in the Exercise and Health; Sport Science major sequences
  • Category B broadening unit for Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Commerce and Bachelor of Design students
  • Level 2 elective
Content This unit is separated into concepts relating to the response of physiology systems to exercise and the responses to exercise at a cellular level. Topics covered in terms of systems physiology include pulmonary ventilation and the lungs, ventilatory response and regulation during exercise, gas exchange and transport, effects of exercise on oxygen dissociation and carbon dioxide transport, electrocardiography, determinants of cardiac output, the vascular response to exercise, exercise and thermoregulation, blood pressure and circulatory control, control of blood flow distribution during exercise, cardiorespiratory control during exercise and limitations to exercise performance. The cellular physiology and biochemistry part of the unit includes the topics of energy transfer in exercise, structure and functions of fats, carbohydrates, creatine phosphate and proteins, the chemistry of fuel oxidation, oxidation of carbohydrate, fat, oxidative phosphorylation and ATP production during exercise. Other topics include anaerobic ATP production during exercise, structures and functions of muscle fibre types, fuel utilisation during exercise, integrated fuel metabolism in exercise, molecular mechanisms of fatigue, water balance during exercise and effect on performance, post-exercise recovery of fuel and water balance, and an introduction to sports nutrition.
Outcomes Students are able to (1) describe the structure and understand the functions of macronutrients; (2) describe the three main energy systems; (3) assess aerobic and anaerobic fitness using a series of cycle tests; (4) describe recruitment of muscle fibres during exercise; (5) describe the function of the respiratory system as well as the different lung volumes and capacities; (6) use a spirometer to assess lung capacities and to interpret the results; (7) describe the function of the cardiovascular system; (8) describe the function of the cardiovascular system; (9) assess heart function using a 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG); and (10) describe the effects of heat.
Assessment Typically this unit is assessed in the following ways: (1) a practical examination and assessment of an associated contemporary activity; (2) mid-semester examination; and (3) end-of-semester examination. Further information is available in the unit outline.

Supplementary assessment is not available in this unit except in the case of a bachelor's pass degree student who has obtained a mark of 45 to 49 overall and is currently enrolled in this unit, and it is the only remaining unit that the student must pass in order to complete their course.
Unit Coordinator(s) Associate Professor Karen Wallman
Unit rules
Approved quota: 250—students enrolled in the Sport Science major and the Exercise and Health major to be admitted first.
Contact hours lectures: 3 hours per week; labs: 2 hours per fortnight; practical sessions: 1 hour per week
Unit Outlinehttp://www.unitoutlines.science.uwa.edu.au/Units/SSEH2260/SEM-1/2017
Text

McArdle, W. D. et al. Essentials of Exercise Physiology, 3rd edn: Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins 2006


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