OCEN4006 Working with Multiple Disciplines

Credit
6 points
Offering
AvailabilityLocationMode
Not available in 2019UWA (Perth)Face to face
Content
The ocean provides many opportunities for sustainable development but is negatively impacted by some human activities. These problems and opportunities are complex and finding the solutions involves collaboration across fields such as science, engineering, psychology, economics, law and international relations. This unit introduces students to the value of working across disciplines, broadening boundaries of knowledge and methodologies, and developing new insights and problem solving skills. Key issues are explored including communication and terminological differences, the scientific method, legal problem solving and research methodologies. The unit examines the concepts of multi-, inter-, cross- and trans-disciplinarity and how they can be applied to address the many challenges facing the oceans. Using a combination of approaches, students learn to work in teams drawn from different fields, and how to apply different disciplinary approaches and ways of thinking to current issues of local and global importance. Ultimately, this unit enables students to assess a line of enquiry in the context of ocean leadership and navigate towards a solution, using critical thinking across a wide range of disciplines.
Outcomes
Students are able to (1) demonstrate a clear understanding of the meaning of multi-, inter-, cross- and trans-disciplinarity in the context of ocean leadership; (2) evaluate an ocean-based issue and identify the range of disciplinary approaches that may be used to resolve complex problems; (3) critically assess the need to employ an approach involving multiple disciplines and practically apply such an approach; (4) understand and identify the appropriate ways in which to work in a multi-disciplinary context taking into account opportunities and challenges; (5) employ new tools, methodologies and knowledge to ocean-based problems and differentiate between local, regional and global solutions; and (6) synthesise, critically appraise and distil information from a range of disciplines and clearly present this information to an informed audience.
Assessment
Indicative assessments in this unit are as follows: (1) group exercises; (2) critical appraisal of case studies; and (3) presentation. Further information is available in the unit outline.

Supplementary assessment is only available in this unit in the case of a student who has obtained a mark of 45 to 49 and is currently enrolled in this unit, and it is the only remaining unit that the student must pass in order to complete their course.
Unit Coordinator(s)
Professor Carolyn Oldham
Contact hours
lectures and turorials: 65 hours
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