GENG4410 Fossil to Future – The Transition

Credit
6 points
Offering
(see Timetable)
AvailabilityLocationMode
Semester 1UWA (Perth)Face to face
Content
This unit explores the current global energy position, inclusive of economic and regulatory driving forces toward transition and future energy production systems, with a focus on an understanding of how the combination of production economics and energy density has dictated system design to date. We discuss how future energy will incorporate distributed storage and generation, the challenges to current transition and renewable energy technologies, and the use and development of transition fuels over the coming 3-5 decades. Finally, the unit explores WA's position in the global energy economy as a provider of LNG-based transition fuel, and as a technology leader in the renewables space.
Outcomes
Students are able to (1) critically appraise the current energy market and driving forces for change; (2) assess energy density amongst current and future sources; (3) evaluate centralised and distributed generation and distribution systems for regional applicability; and (4) analyse the environmental, societal and engineering constraints on the distributed energy landscape.
Assessment
Indicative assessments in this unit are as follows: (1) assignments; (2) term project; and (3) final examination. Further information is available in the unit outline.

Supplementary assessment is only available in this unit in the case of a student who has obtained a mark of 45 to 49 and is currently enrolled in this unit, and it is the only remaining unit that the student must pass in order to complete their course.
Unit Coordinator(s)
Dr Brendan Graham
Unit rules
Prerequisites:
enrolment in the Master of Renewable and Future Energy
or
Master of Engineering in Oil and Gas
or
Master of Professional Engineering (Chemical Engineering)
Contact hours
lectures: 36 hours; practicals: 12 hours
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