ENVT5575 Aquaculture and the Blue Economy

Credit
6 points
Offering

If this unit does not have an online alternative, then students who are presently unable to enter Western Australia and whose studies would be delayed by an inability to complete this unit, should contact the unit coordinator (details given on this page) to ascertain, on an individual case-by-case basis, if alternate arrangements can be made to support their study in this unit.

AvailabilityLocationMode
Not available in 2021UWA (Perth)Face to face Predominantly face-to-face. On campus attendance required to complete this unit. May have accompanying resources online.
Content
Aquaculture is a rapidly growing industry and set to be transformed over coming decades as it becomes a potential alternative to meet global protein requirements. The development of aquaculture has made a great contribution to the supply of fish for human consumption in highly populated countries such as India and China and globally, about half of the fish available for human consumption are the products of aquaculture and most originates from Asia. Aquaculture however also can cause environmental impacts that need to be carefully managed for sustainable coastal development. The first part of this unit covers geographical trends in aquaculture, considering the environments used, the varied types of aquaculture being employed and the science of different aquaculture systems. The second part of the unit looks at environmental impacts (eg from waste inputs) and approaches to reduce impacts. The final part of the unit then explores socio-economic drivers of the aquaculture industry and case studies of different communities using aquaculture to support the regional economy.
Outcomes
Students are able to (1) describe different types of aquaculture used in different geographic regions; (2) explain how different aquaculture systems work, being able to summarise the different technology used across the aquaculture industry; (3) explain how environmental impacts and/or benefits occur as a result of different types of aquaculture systems; (4) evaluate remediation strategies for environmental systems impacted by excessive aquaculture development; and (5) illustrate how social and economic drivers of investment in aquaculture systems are linked to environmental condition.
Assessment
Indicative assessments in this unit are as follows: (1) quizzes; (2) environmental impact assessment report; and (3) case study report. Further information is available in the unit outline.

Supplementary assessment is not available in this unit.
Unit Coordinator(s)
Associate Professor Matthew Hipsey
Unit rules
Prerequisites:
ENVT5576 Aquatic Ecology
Advisable prior study:
SCIE5505 Global Change and the Marine Environment
Contact hours
TBC
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